Patience in gratification, by definition, is to gain fulfillment in the things we love.

Today, we send a text, then, anticipate an immediate response. We buy groceries from our phone and expect it to be delivered in an hour. To wait for something creates inconvenience in our fast paced lives. This is, unfortunately in most instances, the environment students grow up in, every day.


To delay gratification is to practice patience. And, patience allows us to develop, personally, in the things we love most, our core values (kindness, helping others, love). Then, patience in gratification, by definition, is to gain fulfillment in the things we love.


As a kid, I would show up to football practice, same as everyone else, and expect to start in the game. Then, I would learn that an extra hour of agility drills, for weeks, outside of practice, would earn me a starting spot in the game. My son, working on math (or writing) has had a similar experience.


Expecting immediate results, consistently, diminishes our ability to be patient. But, patience is a skill that can be relearned. And, required for students to embrace their full potential.


We can teach our students to practice patience, in response, and, for internal happiness and self-growth.


Originally published on LinkedIn.