Interruption steals what we value most in life: time. And, so does the frustration that follows.

Can you recall a time, for me it was hours ago, when your son or daughter barged into the room, only to steal your attention and ask a non urgent question: “Can I have a snack?” Focused, you begin to feel frustrated, and, sometimes, respond with feelings of anger. “No!”


A kid's enormous need for attention, causing interruptions, is common. And even more common in our new work-life integration home environments.


Interruption steals what we value most in life: time. And, so does the frustration that follows.


With my own kids, I find, I have to remind myself-- I’m asking the child to be empathetic toward me-- and I have to be empathetic toward the child. Instructions to both of us (myself and my child) require time.


Time is, ultimately, how respect in a relationship grows. In a family, or in a business.


When we feel disrespected, we tend to lean on our emotions in our responses.


Injected urgency creates undesirable emotional responses, that, often, results in us not reaching desirable outcomes.


To practice empathy is to approach others with the intention of placing selflessness aside. Beginning with a question that shares in the appreciation of others’ actions, not a push of a personal agenda. The result is then, realizing desirable outcomes from each person's point of view.