Bias and judgment is an anchor for information; it allows us to order the world.

At a time when trombone players were thought to be only men, Abbie Conant became one of the best trombone players for the Munich Philharmonic. Recognizing her odds, she auditioned behind closed curtains, removing the environment for judgement and bias.


Human beings place snap judgements on others through a process researched and referred to as thin-slicing, according to Malcom Gladwell.


Moments of bias inhibit our opportunities to be the best teacher, parent or coach.


With teachers, a student that gets a C+ on their first test will then perceive the student as average- lacking effort. If the student puts in their best work on the next essay, they may receive, at best, a grade of a B.


Bias and judgment is an anchor for information; it allows us to order the world. However, it also shelters us from seeing exactly what is happening.


Not recognizing this can interrupt the student’s understanding of cause/effect. When students put in the extra effort, it would benefit the student if teachers and parents recognize it, which means being aware of thin-slicing.


Tip: Not recognizing our biases can undermine a student’s understanding of cause/effect.


Originally published on LinkedIn.